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Pokemon Go crosses 75 million installs mark after Android launch

pokemon go 100 million installs
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Barely 3 weeks after it launched on the Android platform, Pokemon Go has started setting milestones here too. As per data from app store analysts Sensor Tower, the application reached the 50 million downloads mark on android, over the weekend! The company also said that it takes Pokemon Go’s total score to 75 million installs across the world.

And since we are talking records, Pokemon Go is also the first game to have reached the 50-million mark anywhere under a month. The application launched on the Android platform in Australia and New Zealand on July 5 and cracked a half ton (multiplied by a million) barely 19 days hence. Compare it with the games on the second and third rung of the list and you will find that it took Color Switch and the immensely popular, 77 and 81 days respectively to reach the mark.


As per Sensor Tower,

Since its launch, we now estimate that Pokémon GO has been installed more than 75 million times across Apple and Google’s platforms globally, putting it in a class by itself for first-month mobile game downloads.

Even more interesting, is the fact that the app has only launched in 32 of the over 100 regions where both Apple’s App Store and Google Play operate. So the application has plenty of scope in the future as it makes its way to more, unexplored markets.


Ingress, which used to be Niantic’s Pikachu before Go arrived to take it’s place, has also received a significant surge in number of users as a consequence of Pokemon Go’s popularity. According to data, Ingress is now in Japan’s top 10 applications on the App Store for the first time ever! Apart from the fact that it gained a fair bit of attention as Pokemon Go’s sibling, many users have also found it to be a more reliable way of finding Pokémon locations than the in-game Pokémon finder.

Talking about Pokemon locations, the Internet is all abuzz with the strange places the little monsters have taken to appearing. For example, there have been reports of a Gastly appearing right above the corpse of a freshly dead Raccoon in Toronto. The poor old Raccoon’s spirit will now live forever, in a Pokeball! As if the Raccoon episode isn’t odd enough in itself, there have also been reports of Tauros appearing amid herds of cows. Christ!

So what’s next for Pokemon Go? Updates definitely, which are being slated for release even as we speak, and app debuts in other countries, including those in Asia. If the company manages to maintain its impetus, Pokemon Go may just make it to a 100 million downloads within a couple of months.

However, all that popularity is no permanent. I mean it is still a game, and no matter how interesting a game is, people eventually get bored. As per SurveyMonkey, the game is already well past it’s heyday in the US and the number of Daily Active Users in on a slope that rapidly becoming higher.

In terms of daily active users, the largest day for Pokémon Go in the US was July 14th, exactly one week after the game’s debut. We estimate that just over 25 million smartphone users played the game on that day, though usage levels were fairly steady at just over 25 million users few a few days around that time before declining.

The DAUs were down to well under 20 million after the 20th of July. Similarly, the number of new downloads have also declines, arriving at under 2 million on the 20th from well over 5 millions on the 7th of July.

In retrospect, the strategy of launching Pokemon slowly rather than everywhere at once, makes more sense following this revelation. Not only will this allow the app to maintain a more uniform revenue and usage curve but will also mean that there are actually users around to appreciate it’s updates. Assuming the decline to be a trend that will  be repeated everywhere it launches, staggering the launch seems to be a wise move.


A bibliophile and a business enthusiast.

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