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Corning Launches A New Photo Print Service For India That Turns Memories Into Long Lasting Inscriptions

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After offering mobile devices across the globe with scratch resistant screens, Corning is introducing an online service for the Indian market through which users can get photographs printed on high-resolution, scratch-resistant Gorilla glass panels.

Corning, which supplies its products to clients in the auto, pharma and telecom industry, is also looking to ship its optic fibres manufactured in India and will soon implement the strategy.

Prime Minister Modi is making a big pitch for Make in India. If a player like Apple starts making part of its phones in India that would be a tipping point,

said Thomas Appelt, Corning’s president for international emerging market.

India is isn’t a new market to the 168 year old glass manufacturer. It first set shop in India in 1988 and started its optic fibre cable manufacturing unit in Pune three years ago. As of now, Corning has its footprints in the interior furnishings market as it is a major supplier of special laminates. Its new plan seems to have been strategized keeping in mind the high end audience. Though it hasn’t dealt details on the cost, it has revealed that supply chain for its new venture is already up and running.

Its new growth plans for the Indian market may help firm its foothold in the Asia Pacific region, which makes up for 60% of its revenues. India, along with other South East Asian countries, supply Corning with annual revenue of $300 million.

“Our India revenues may not seem large, but we have seen nice growth over the past four years – driven by the optical fibre infrastructure market in India. Most of our business segments are seeing an upward trend so we are looking to grow with new products in the Indian market,” Appelt said.

Corning believes that instead of framing phots with glass, the photos can be printed on it, thereby increasing its longevity. Its Gorilla glass takes care of any scratches that might otherwise leave a lasting scrape if it was a usual glass.

Paper photos get destroyed, but Gorilla glass survives 80% of all drops from about 1 metre height, so such prints can stay for over 100 years. We hope this will find customers who can print five or seven pictures for their rooms, if not their entire wedding albums,

Appelt said.

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