China Google News

Gmail access partially restored in China

6133587103_93b8e75a12_b
Share on Facebook
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on Reddit

6133587103_93b8e75a12_b

Post the total occlusion in China, Gmail is now gaining a gradual restore in the country, as reported by Gmail users in China and depicted by Google’s real-time traffic graph.

China has been eradicating the presence of Google out of the country since months. The latest outage that emerged, blocking the Gmail access in the country via third party apps like Microsoft Outlook and Apple Mail, was considered to be another ruthless move from Chinese side to kick out Gmail completely.

China censor department dusted off the allegations and said that everything is good at their end. Further, it went on saying that Google might be tangled with its own technical issues and might be the reason for the outage. Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying said Monday that she was not even aware of the situation. Interestingly, Google replied that there mail service is working totally fine and is facing no such issues. Who is to blame then? No, not North Korea.

China’s global times says that “Google voluntarily quit the mainland market in 2010” and its too kiddish to point fingers at China’s authorities without a proof. It further cites the visit of China’s top Internet regulator Lu Wei to Google’s US headquarters earlier this month to make bilateral relations better between the two parties.

While tech-geeks are still waiting for either party to state the reason for the temporary outage, enterprises and individuals who rely on Gmail for their business and other necessary chores are more than just happy to welcome the email service’s return. Google’s real-time traffic graph is rising scantly in the country and the service is is not accessible completely. Only a subsets of users have been spotted to report the restore while other are still mourning over the inaccessibility.

IMAGE : FLICKR / CC 2.0 LICENSE / CAIRO

Senior Writer


Add Comment

Click here to post a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *